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CHLOE FUND

Chloe, a cocker spaniel, was the first shelter animal to benefit from ACES fundraising efforts. Thanks to contributions and support from people like you, we were able to provide medical care for Chloe that changed her life, and that of her owner, Delora Knudson, for the better.

In 2006, Chloe was relinquished to the shelter by her owners because she was severely injured and they could not afford to care for her.

Dr. Jennifer Sipes, the Animal Shelter vet, examined Chloe and determined that she probably had a damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). This condition requires surgery, and fairly expensive surgery at that. What’s more, her injury was so severe she was determined not to be adoptable in her current condition.

The Animal Medical Center confirmed that she had injured her ACL and that surgery was needed. Although the Animal Medical Center gave us the lowest cost estimate they could for the surgery, the Shelter still couldn’t provide the funds. Animal Shelter medical funds only pay for routine medical procedures. If more is needed, it has to come from donations.

That’s where the ACES Foundation came in. Thanks in large part to money raised at Cookout For Critters event and our Golf Tournament, Putt Fore Pets, we were able to pay for the surgery. Chloe came through the surgery beautifully and was ready to be adopted.

When Delora Knudson came in looking for a companion, she saw Chloe and fell in love. Apparently, it was mutual. Chloe now has a forever home.

In her honor, ACES has established the CHLOE MEDICAL EMERGENCY FUND to help other animals in need of extraordinary medical care.

AMONG THE MANY WE’VE HELPED, HERE ARE 2 WHO HAVE FOREVER HOMES NOW!:

HANK, an Alaskan Malamute.  Hank escaped his new owner and was struck by a car.  The owner was unable to pay for the extensive repairs that were required, so Hank was relinquished back to the animal shelter.  ACES Foundation paid for the surgery, and Hank now has a great home with his new owners who report Hank is a great member of their family, and is very active and interacts well with their other canine household members

HANK &                                                                                                                                                       EUGENE

 

 BIG DONORS WITH BIG HEARTS


2:15 p.m., Dec. 20, 2012

EL CAJON — Many kids dream of getting a puppy or kitten for Christmas.

Seven-year-old Lialla Sass of La Mesa had a dream of giving to some less fortunate dogs and cats before Christmas.

Back in October, with the permission of her parents and school officials, Lialla held a bake sale at the Barona Charter Indian School, where she is a second-grade student, to raise money for the El Cajon Animal Shelter.

“One day I was driving home from school and she said, ‘I’m going to have a bake sale,’” recalled her mother, Dana Sass. “She said she planned on giving the money from the bake sale to the animal shelter, ‘because the puppies and kitties need a home, too.’ I told her she needed permission from her teacher and the principal (Bill Adams). She said, ‘I already talked to them.’”

Lialla’s 9-year-old sister, Audrey, a fourth grader, made fliers to promote the Oct. 22 event around the school, which is a K-8 public charter school on the Barona Indian reservation, and Dana Sass and her daughters got busy baking.

“The animals, they don’t have any homes or families,” Lialla said of why she felt compelled to hold the bake sale, which included muffins, cake pops, chocolate-dipped brownie bars and Rice Krispies treats, sold for $1 each. “They don’t have a mom, or a friend, or a home. And this will help them. It felt good to help.”

Kids and faculty gobbled up the goodies. Unsold items were bought by employees at California Bank & Trust in Grossmont Center, at the San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce and at the Boys & Girls Clubs of East County in Santee.

A popular sale it was: Her check for $500 was presented to the shelter this week.

And along with Lialla’s bake sale proceeds, Barona Resort & Casino will give the shelter a check in the amount of $2,500. Lialla’s mother, Dana, works for Barona.

“As a mom, I feel personally blessed that I can teach my children the importance of giving back,” Sass said. “They may not be able to articulate it, but the spirit is in their hearts and it comes naturally to them. They can teach their friends how to be socially responsible just as Barona has corporate social responsibility.”

Peggy Buffo, past president of the El Cajon ACES Foundation, the nonprofit group that supports the shelter by raising money for medical car, encouraging animal adoptions and promoting public education about the proper care of animals, said shelter personnel and volunteers were moved by Lialla’s spirit.

“She’s going to be an impressive young lady,” Buffo said. “And the goal was to help animals, which I think is so compassionate.”

Audrey, who wants to be a marine biologist, said she wouldn’t mind her family adopting an animal of its own sometime soon.

“I really like puppies and kitties and other animals, too,” Audrey said. “I want a Labradoodle, and a cute and slobbery St. Bernard!”

The shelter is at 1275 N. Marshall Ave., in El Cajon.

Karen.Pearlman@utsandiego.com; (619) 293-1829; Twitter @karenpearlman


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IMG_1572ANOTHER YOUNG LADY FORGOING GIFTS FOR HER BIRTHDAY, INSTEAD ASKING HER FAMILY AND FRIENDS TO BRING FOOD AND TREATS FOR THE SHELTER DOGS!  THANKS OLIVIA, YOUR GENEROSITY IS MUCH APPRECIATED!

 

 



 
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